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by The Constitutional Monarchy of The Kingdom of Denmark. . 12 reads.

Europinion Questioning #3 Week 3 ~ South St Maarten

The Kingdom of Denmark/Question:
Which country(s) do you think did their best with managing the Covid-19 pandemic?

South St Maarten:
I think quite a few had valiant efforts, but to pick one, Sweden. Despite getting a decent amount of cases early on, they were able to slow down the number of cases and even amid Europe's recent spike, they've been on a downward curve. Throughout all this, the Swedes have tried to socially distance and be cautious as much as possible, and in return, they really never had to go into a full lockdown like many other parts of the world. New Zealand, South Korea, & Singapore could be some others.

The Kingdom of Denmark/Question:
Which country(s) do you think did their absolute worst with managing the Covid-19 pandemic?

South St Maarten:
Brazil and the United States of America. They've sent mixed messages about the pandemic, sometimes denying it altogether, and simultaneously cases continue to skyrocket in both of those nations.

The Kingdom of Denmark/Question:
How do you think America reacted to the virus (compared to other nations)?

South St Maarten:
I think America preformed much worse than other nations. They sent mixed messages about the pandemic, failed to control it, and are in the midst of bitter opposition to proper social distancing and mask wearing guidelines. As a person from Connecticut, I can say that the absense of a unified front between Federal, State, and Local levels has been striking. You cannot expect a nation to improve when its leaders aren't unified. As cases get better in New York and New England, they spike in Arizona. Arizona gets a bit better, Texas and Florida start getting worse. If everyone was united in the seriousness and danger of Covid-19 in the first place, it could have been under control. But alas, it didn't happen. As President Lincoln once said, "A house divided upon itself cannot stand".

The Kingdom of Denmark/Question:
Do you think that President Trump did the best he could to manage America's Outbreak?

South St Maarten:
Absolutely not. In fact, I would say he was in the bottom 2 of the world. By continuing to refuse the increase in cases he's divided the nation and his comments on hydroxychoriquin and UV lighting further iligitimize his response.

The Kingdom of Denmark/Question:
When do you think the Coronavirus cases will decline enough for the U.S. to reopen its public infrastructure?

South St Maarten:
I think when a vaccine reaches the open market, which is tentatively set for the beginning months of 2021. I believe America is too vast, too divided, and too poorly led to get back to normal beforehand.

The Champions League/Question:
To avoid the pandemic, what would've you done differently at the beginning?

South St Maarten:
I would have sent a clear precedent that this is real, and instituted a series of fines if people don't obey social distancing/mask laws.

The Champions League/Question:
You see an increased amount of cases, what would you do to flatten the curve?

South St Maarten:
Set strict social distancing orders and mask mandates and require a lockdown with hefty fines for violators. Then, wait for the curve to flatten, and when it does, create a multi-stage plan, as some northeastern states have done, to open up safely and without reversing the progress previously made.

The Champions League/Question:
Why do you think the government and the populace didn't react as quickly?

South St Maarten:
Quite simply, humans are hesitant to react to something so drastically so quickly. You don't want to close down over nothing. Yes, in hindsight it would have been wise to close sooner, but if we had closed and nothing happened, it would ruin the credibility of many health organizations and create a "false alarm' of sorts.

The Champions League/Question:
How likely do you see this happening again? Why and where?

South St Maarten:
I see it happening again. I don't know when or why or how or where, but things have a way of repeating itself. Between Bio-engineering, animals transferring diseases to humans, and the world becoming increasingly interconnected, I feel another pandemic is inevitable at some point. Humanity has faced this threat its entire existence.

The Champions League/Question:
Will the world learn from its mistakes to avoid this from happening again?

South St Maarten:
Yes and no. I often say, history repeats itself, but at least we know what is coming. I am sure that at some point in human history another pandemic will occur, because it always has. However, I'm cautiously optimistic that when that day comes, the world will have learned a lesson from this and will be better prepared and have a better mindset going into the next one.

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